Click below to listen to Episode 14 – National Christian Foundation with Guest Ryan Assunto

Episode 14 – National Christian Foundation with Guest Ryan Assunto

Learn more about National Christian Foundation from its Austin president, Ryan Assunto.

In this episode of Christian Financial Perspectives, Bob and Mary Jo discuss the joy of giving. Also joining Bob and Mary Jo is Ryan Assunto, the President of the National Christian Foundation Austin (NCF).

Ryan serves generous givers throughout Central Texas through NCF. He is passionate about helping givers experience the life-changing joy of generosity. He is focused on relationship development with individuals, families, professional advisors, and ministry leaders.

The National Christian Foundation offers creative solutions and tax-smart strategies to help individuals like you give more efficiently, to wisely steward all that God has entrusted, and to make the biggest possible impact in the areas of your greatest passion. Every day, we see hearts and lives changed through the joy of generosity!

GUESTS: Ryan Assunto
HOSTED BY: Bob Barber, CWS® and Mary Jo Lyons, CFP®

Mentioned In This Episode

Christian Financial Advisors
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Bob Barber, CWS®, CKA®
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Mary Jo Lyons, CFP®, CKA®
Ryan Assunto
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National Christian Foundation
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EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

[INTRODUCTION]

Bob: Welcome to Christian Financial Perspectives, a podcast where we talk about ways to integrate your faith with your finances. This is Bob Barber.

Mary Jo: And I’m Mary Jo Lyons.

Bob: Are you ready to learn how to apply biblical wisdom to everyday financial decisions?

Mary Jo: Join us as we look at integrating your faith with your finances. If it’s your first time listening, welcome to our podcast, and if you’re a returning listener, welcome back.

[EPISODE]

Bob:
Matthew 25:35-40, “‘For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat. I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink. I was a stranger and you invited me in. I needed clothes and you clothed me. I was sick and you looked after me. I was in prison and you came to visit me. Then the righteous will answer him. ‘Lord, When did we see you hungry and feed you or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go visit you?’ The King will reply. ‘Truly, I tell you, whatever you did for the least of these brothers and sisters of mine you did for me.'”

Mary Jo:
In today’s episode of Christian Financial Perspectives, we’re going to discuss the joy of giving with our friends from the National Christian Foundation. The National Christian Foundation offers creative solutions and tax smart strategies to help you give more efficiently, to wisely steward all that God has entrusted to you, and to make the biggest possible impact in the areas of your greatest passion. Every day, we see hearts and lives change through the joy of generosity, and that makes me think about Luke 6:38, “Give and it will be given to you.”

Bob:
Our special guest is Mr. Ryan Assunto. He’s truly a brother in Christ I’ve gotten to know over the last few years. He’s president of the National Christian Foundation in Austin serving generous givers throughout Central Texas. Ryan is truly passionate about helping givers experience the life changing joy of generosity. He’s focused on relationship development with individuals, families, professional advisors, and ministry leaders. He’s a graduate of Texas A & M University.

Mary Jo:
Gig ’em, Aggie’s.

Bob:
There you go, Mary Jo! That’s right. With a BA in communications from Dallas Theological Seminary and a master’s degree in biblical counseling. His career includes experience in vocational Christian ministry as a professional counselor and college pastor, as well as significant involvement in multiple facets of the residential and multifamily construction industries.

Mary Jo:
Welcome, Ryan. To kick us off, why don’t you start by telling us a little bit more about yourself and the National Christian Foundation.

Ryan:
Well, thanks guys. It’s a blessing to be with you today. here at NCF, we are blessed to be the eighth largest public charity in the United States. We were founded in 1982 by three gentlemen, Larry Burkett, Ron Blue, and Terry Parker. And in our history we have been able to receive about $13 billion worth of charitable gifts and send out over $10 billion in grants to charity. So, we’re a donor advised fund sponsor who also facilitates asset based giving. Again, we’ve been blessed to support over 55,000 charities in our history.

Bob:
Ryan, whenever I tell somebody about the National Christian Foundation and I mention the name Larry Burkett in the Christian community, people go, Oh yeah, I remember him because of his radio programming for so many years.

Ryan:
That’s right. Larry Burkett had been a super influential individual in many lives and has several people who are operating in the same vein today, such as Dave Ramsey and a handful of others who just continue to teach our Church, with a capital C, how to combine their faith with their finances in a way that honors God.

Bob:
Hey, I like it when you say that because that’s what we’re all about. Our logo is integrating faith and finance. So Ryan, what is the purpose of the National Christian Foundation?

Ryan:
Well, when you talk about purpose, you talk about our vision and our mission, and at the National Christian Foundation, our vision is to see every person reached and restored through the love of Christ. That’s a big vision that sounds probably larger than what a typical community foundation would have. But again, we see ourselves as a part of the Church, the capital C Church, worldwide who is looking to see people come to know Jesus and be redeemed and restored in him. Our particular mission, what we do is we help mobilize resources by inspiring biblical generosity. So, we come alongside generous Christian families to help them find creative ways to simplify their giving and multiply their impact.

Bob:
Ryan, I understand that the National Christian Foundation has offices from coast to coast. Can you talk a little bit about your structure and how that works?

Ryan:
Yeah, I’d be glad to. So we have a national office that is in Alpharetta, Georgia, just North of Atlanta. We have about 30 local offices across the country. So in most major metropolitan areas, NCF has a presence. And the great thing about our structure is that we have the size and scale of a large, national, community foundation with tremendous reach and resources. And then we have the small and intimate personal relationships that you get when you go to work with a local community foundation, people who know your community, people who know the nonprofits in your community, people who know how to share a true ministry of generosity in the local markets where they serve.

Mary Jo:
And you’re in Austin, Texas, isn’t that correct?

Ryan:
That’s correct. I’m in Austin, Texas, and personally I have givers all across Central Texas. So really from down in the Valley to up North to Austin, to the Texas Hill country and as far East as College Station. I’ve got some cohorts in the Houston area and Dallas area as well as one in Waco. And so our presence in Texas continues.

Bob:
Yeah. Ryan, don’t you have a local office in Houston too, right?

Ryan:
We do. We do, yeah. The Houston office has been significant really in the formation of our ministry in Austin. They planted the initial seeds to develop relationships with generous Christian families and have fund holders here in in the Central Texas area. And then they’ve handed those relationships off to me, really, in a spirit of generosity to continue growing and expanding our ministry in Central Texas.

Bob:
So this is truly a foundation that, when you look at it from the global scale, is very, very large. It’s nationwide and then it gets down to the smaller scale where you have divisions in different parts of the country that can help people with giving strategies right in their local market.

Ryan:
That’s exactly right. That’s exactly right, Bob.

Bob:
So one of your flagship things that I really know about the National Christian Foundation is what is referred to as the giving fund, which also in the industry we refer to it as a donor advised fund. So tell our listeners what is a giving fund, what’s the purpose of a giving fund, and what can it do?

Ryan:
Sure. So a giving fund is, you used the term correctly, Bob. It’s a donor advised fund. That’s how most people know it in the financial world. In house, we call it a giving fund because when you open a donor advised fund with NCF, you’re opening a fund truly with a giving partner. We are actively helping you find ways to get dollars to the charities and the nonprofits and the churches that God calls you to support. So we want to see your money flow. We want to see you give it away in a way that impacts your family and yourself and the world around you. So a giving fund, one way to think of it is like a charitable checking account. It’s a portal where you can make deposits or contributions and receive your tax treatment at the time of those contributions. Then over time, make grants to the charities you want to support. Maybe that’s your church, maybe that’s young life, maybe that’s the local humane society. It could be a lot of different charities. But basically, you’ve got one portal, one account, that is your giving fund where you put contributions in and then make grants out. The giving fund is particularly helpful at separating, or decoupling if you will, the tax benefits of charitable giving with the strategic granting that donors choose to make.

Mary Jo:
So if you don’t know where you want to give or you’re concerned that maybe, well I want to do this now, but next year I might have another cause that’s near and dear. Am I understanding it correctly that you can give now, but decide later where you want those specific grants to go.

Ryan:
That’s exactly right, Mary Jo. You can give now and make your decisions about specific granting later. That’s particularly helpful at this time of year. As we’re approaching the holidays, Christmas season, and New Year’s, we’re approaching the end of the year and people are usually thinking about taxes and they’re usually thinking about giving all at the end of the year and what this does, it helps to separate again, the idea that, Oh, it’s December 31st I better write a lot of checks or I better get my charitable giving done. Effectively, what happens is people make grants in a very reactive, not necessarily a very prayerful way, and what the donor advised fund or the giving fund allows people to do is to put all their charitable gifts in one place, get the tax treatment before the end of the year or whenever, and then really be prayerful and thoughtful and strategic about how much to give to particular charities and for what causes, and if you want to wait for other opportunities to arise like a summer mission trip or something like that that you want to support. You can do that with dollars that you earned in the previous year, so you match your income recognition to the tax treatment of your charitable dollars. But then again, take your time being thoughtful and strategic about where to actually make your grants.

Bob:
I’d like to throw something in here that a couple of years ago when we had a client that had sold a major business here in Central Texas, and he had this windfall of cash and he wanted to tithe off of that sale from his business, but he didn’t know where he wanted to give all that money to, but he needed the tax deduction for that year. So he was able to take that 10%. Actually, it was about 15%. I remember now it was about 15% from the sale of his business. He put that into his giving fund, and he is still giving to ministries to this day, and it’s been about four or five years ago now, from that giving fund.

Ryan:
That’s a great story, Bob, and a great reason why people give to donor advised funds, why they use these giving funds, and it’s frequently they need the tax deduction in a particular year, but they don’t want to just randomly write checks to charities. They want to take their time, they want to be strategic, or they want to set up a pool of capital that can be used for ongoing giving over a period of years.

Mary Jo:
With the new tax laws and the higher amount that’s needed to itemize deductions, how has this played into the amount people focused on in funding a donor advised fund?

Ryan:
Yeah, so if you’re concerned about kind of meeting the minimum, if you will, to itemize, what some donors will do is they’ll try to think through a couple of years of giving at a time, right? So, they can fund a donor advised fund with twice the amount they would typically give and then surpass the minimum required to able to itemize and then take two years giving that money away. Again, sort of stockpile on their own and their own account, and a couple of years later fund the donor advised fund again with enough money to get past the itemization. You frequently see people using donor advised funds in an increased capacity because of the new tax law because it allows them to bundle their giving into a year where they can surpass the minimum needed to itemize.

Bob:
Yeah, and that really holds especially true. We’ve been talking about this a lot, Ryan, Mary Jo and I have, with the new deduction now. The top having to be $24,000 for a couple. Let’s assume a couple has everything paid off. They don’t really have a lot of itemized deductions, and their income is say $100,000 a year, so they’re used to giving around $10,000 a year from just the tithe part of it. This year, it’s not going to be deductible or even get close to that because they’re not going to reach that $24,000, so they could double up on their giving in one year. This is what we’re talking about when you hear this.

Mary Jo:
Well, you’ve shared with us about the giving fund, but you also have the cornerstone fund. What’s the difference between those funds?

Ryan:
So, the cornerstone fund is really built for families who want to use a donor advised fund as a substitute for a private foundation. So they’re looking to stockpile assets that will be given away over long periods of time. The typical cornerstone fund holder is looking to carry a balance of, I would say 2.5-2.6 million dollars, and they’re looking to keep that fund not necessarily whole, but they’re looking for those assets to be used over a long period of time for charitable purposes. So, the cornerstone fund has a few other features to it that allow for some family funds, meaning your kids can have funds sort of underneath it in a nesting fashion. You’ve got some international granting capabilities with the cornerstone funds that are unique. We’re looking into some investment opportunities that are unique in the cornerstone fund environment. But again, they’re really built for givers who are looking to build a reservoir from which to give over years and years and years.

Mary Jo:
Excellent. As we’ve been talking, something’s occurred to me. You look at the giving fund or setting up a donor advised fund, and you want to fund that each year with whatever you’re going to be allocating towards charity. But what if you plan to give each year, but say you don’t have children and you’re not leaving anything to the next generation, but you want to be able to have your secondary beneficiary to be charitable organizations. Could you then instead use your giving fund as that beneficiary?

Ryan:
Absolutely, and that’s another great use of a giving fund. You can include the giving fund in a will or as a beneficiary on a life insurance policy or a lot of other scenarios that come into play when you think about end of life giving, and what that does is it really makes your estate planning and your estate documents simple. Instead of listing four or five or six different charities in your will, and then let’s say there’s a change at one of those charities, change in leadership, change in direction, something comes up and that’s not the charity you want to support anymore. You’d rather support a different charity. Well, then you’ve got to go rewrite your will, but if you simply insert as the charitable beneficiary of your will a giving fund, then you can handle all your succession planning in house with NCF and let us know when the time comes how you would like those funds distributed. We can take charge of that. We have a charity research team that does due diligence on all of our nonprofits that we support. We can fulfill your wishes in just a streamlined fashion that doesn’t involve going back to your will every time there’s a change in charitable desire.

Bob:
This is one of the main things that we’ve done for our family. We call it the Barber family giving fund. We have in our estate right now that 20% of that will go to the giving fund. It’s not just good for the estate and good for helping others, but it also definitely creates a giving mindset in your children because now your children are going to be giving away that money.

Ryan:
That’s right. One of the great things about planning in this way is the effect it has on your family. It begins to be very clear to your kids, to your heirs, whoever they may be. When you set up intentional, proactive, charitable giving in your will, it communicates a value and it communicates a desire that is well beyond simply leaving your kids a big pile of money. It communicates something that may be much more valuable to them in the long run about how to live and about how to find joy and about how to walk with God generously in this life.

Bob:
You’ve talked about the different types of funds that you have. How can people fund these funds besides just cash?

Ryan:
Right? Yeah, so that’s a great question and one that we love to help donors sort through. The statistics, Bob, are that in the US, wealth is held primarily in two ways – in non-cash assets and then cash assets. Cash assets actually make up a very small percentage of American wealth. Only 10% of wealth in the US is held in cash, leaving 90% to be held in something other than cash. Oddly enough, when you look at charitable giving statistics, 80% of all charitable gifts come out of cash, and 20% come out of non-cash. So what we see, and this is the great tool the donor advised fund, is that most people aren’t thinking about their real sources of wealth when it comes to charitable giving. We like to help people think through what does it look like to give to the Kingdom everything that God has entrusted to me. What does it look like to give from everything he’s put in my hands? So, we can help donors think through highly appreciated stocks and bonds, publicly traded securities. We can help people think through required minimum distributions from an IRA. We can also help people think through how do you handle private business ownership? How do you handle real estate holdings? How do you handle intellectual property or mineral rights or some other income producing asset that might be useful in the kingdom and advantageous to use for giving funds?

Mary Jo:
And you have a lot of experts on staff that can help kind of unwind some of those. It would be much easier for somebody that doesn’t know what to do with those assets. Am I on the right track there?

Ryan:
You’re exactly on the right track, Mary Jo. We have an in house team of legal experts, probably about a dozen gift planning attorneys that look at assets for the purposes of charitable gifting all day long, and so that in house expertise is really one of the things that sets National Christian Foundation apart from other donor advised fund providers. We can come alongside a generous, Christian family and evaluate what you own and how you own it so that we can see how it may be used for kingdom purposes, how it may be used for charitable purposes, and managing the legal implications of ownership and the tax implications of charitable ownership as what we do in house every day. And so that internal expertise is really a lot of the reason why people come to work with NCF.

Mary Jo:
I know that we’ve talked about giving highly appreciated stock to a fund such as this, but I would also imagine that for those families that have a concentrated position, and especially one that’s an emotional, they have an emotional attachment to a specific stock. Say it was one they inherited from their grandfather or their grandmother or that their father had bought and held forever. So, they’re reluctant to sell that, but if they could donate that to a fund and then continue to benefit the kingdom with those assets, it might help relieve them of some of that emotional turmoil. Does that make sense?

Ryan:
Absolutely, Mary Jo, and you and you make a great point. We do get attached to our stuff. That’s a cultural norm and something which, whether you’re deeply mature Christian believer or not, it’s a struggle that we all have. We get attached to our things. As we really make the spiritual shift towards understanding that it’s God who owns everything. It’s God who gave us everything we have, right? All of this belongs to him. And when you start thinking about what do we do with the stuff that God has put in our hands, you really have to start to ask the question, well, if God owns the stuff, maybe I should ask the owner of the stuff what he wants me to do with it. And so as people began to really understand “their” assets as God’s assets, then there’s a shift that you can make that really sets you free to pursue joy and purpose. And once you are walking in that freedom, you’re able to make some really exciting and encouraging decisions about the things God has put in your hands, whatever their earthly source may be, right? If it’s your grandfather’s stock or whatever it may be, you’re really able to make some better decisions. As you look particularly at stocks that might be handed down, the significant thing to realize from a stewardship perspective is that if you were to sell those stocks, then you’d have a tremendous tax burden. But if you gave those stocks, you actually get a tax deduction that’s helpful for you. And then we, as a charity, liquidate those stocks free of any capital gains exposure, typically. You have that whole value to go to kingdom causes, to go to the nonprofits that you and your family would have wanted to support.

Mary Jo:
I love that, and it’s such food for thought. As we were preparing for this week’s episode in our discussion with you, Ryan, there was something that was on my heart. We talk mostly about what God’s word says about money, and we often refer to scripture in our podcast, but there is a quote from Winston Churchill that I like that I thought I’d share with our listeners. “You make a living by what you get, but you make a life by what you give.” I just think that’s so profound.

Bob:
Ryan, I know you’ve had some interesting stories already about some creative ways that Christians have given, but can you share some stories of an actual family, without giving away their nam,e and maybe a company that they gave to the Lord or just anything that’s unique that you could tell us about? Cause I know you’ve got some great stories.

Ryan:
Yeah we do. We’ve got so many stories. My biggest question, Bob is how long is your podcast? Because the Lord has really brought some neat people our way that we’ve been able to serve and come alongside of. And what I love about our work at NCF is National Christian Foundation is never the hero of any story. God is the hero of the story. The families that we work with are really the players and we’re just trying to help them do what God has called them to do. A lot of families come to us because their giving is complicated. So, the giving fund helps them simplify their giving. On one level you might be a family that is trying to give generously and trying to support all the charities you can. Come tax time, you’ve supported 15 or 20 or 30 different charities throughout the course of the year. It’s kind of a hassle to go back and find all those receipts and to report on all of that. So if you want your deduction, you’ve got to go dig through all that paperwork. On the simplest way, the giving fund helps you minimize all that paperwork where you now have one receipt to go get, right? And so for many families, they find themselves more free to give because the process is simplified. They’ve got one fund, they’ve got one portal, through which all of their charitable giving flows. And so when they need to think about what are we doing with our charitable giving or they need to talk to their kids about what we want to do about charitable giving or even just analyze where they’ve given over the last three to five years to know what’s happened to this money that we’ve sent away. If you’ve centralized it in one place, the giving fund really helps you connect your heart to your charitable giving. I don’t even know the number of families that have that story, right. My giving was super complicated and all of a sudden the open this donor advised fund, and I found more joy and more freedom and more intentionality just because it was all held in one place. So, we love those stories. Those are fantastic. On a bigger scale, we’ve got a donor who has believed forever that God owned his business and gave super generously from that business. His business grew and became a significant issue from a tax and a state perspective, and his attorneys came to him and said, we realize you believe that God owns your business, but the IRS thinks that you and your brother each own half. So, he went looking for, well, what do we do about this? If somebody dies, then we’re going to have to sell the business to pay the taxes. That was the problem. The solution eventually became, let’s give away the business. And so they did. And there’s tremendous dollars that flow to charity and nonprofit causes every year because of this gentleman’s generosity. And I got to spend some time with his son a couple of months ago. And the great thing about being with a son was the son’s story is, Hey, I could have been the heir to a business that has a value of nine figures, and that could have all been mine, but my dad gave it away. This son was not at all upset. He did not at all feel slighted. He felt like his dad made the biggest investment in him, as the son, that he could have made when he gave the business away because his dad was handing him a value of eternal significance as opposed to a bank account that he could squander pretty quickly if he wanted to. It was amazing to me to see the transformation in the second generation, the transformation in the son as he reflected on his father’s generosity and really the mess he knew he could have made with the money, but that his dad protected him from by making kingdom minded decisions before it ever had a chance to go awry.

Bob:
That is extremely powerful, and I hope everybody got that because so many times people fear about giving to organizations that have an internal impact over giving to their children. And this is a good example of it didn’t hurt the child at all.

Ryan:
No. In fact, the child would say it was a major help, right? It was the opposite of hurting. It was a positive experience for him to really learn and lean into a lifestyle that had real value.

Mary Jo:
Money does strange things to people. You’ve heard that said many times, but I would offer that giving does wonderful things for people. It brings such joy to your heart. That’s a great story, Ryan. Thank you for sharing it. Now, I’ve also heard about gift annuities. So can you tell us a little bit about those, what they are, and how they work?

Ryan:
Sure, sure. So charitable gift annuities, they fit in a category of what we in the charitable giving landscape call a ‘split interest gift’. And what that means is you want to make a charitable gift, but you also need to account for, in your own life, circumstances and income needs that may arise. None of us know what the future holds, and so it’s wise to plan for taking care of yourself and taking care of your family as you go through life. And so charitable gift annuities really helped people who have a need for a guaranteed income stream, right? Like an annuity provides, but they also want to make a charitable gift, hence the term split interest gift. A charitable gift annuity benefits both the original donor and charities that they want to support. So, you’ve got two different interests at play. You can fund a charitable gift annuity with a lot of different vehicles. Cash is only one, but you can also use stocks and privately held business and real estate to fund a charitable gift annuity. And when you do that, you have a guaranteed income stream for life. Then a remaining value that is allocable to charity, and what we do at NCF with our charitable gift annuities is that we take that remainder value and we make it usable to the giver upfront when they purchase the charitable gift annuity, so they don’t have to wait to make their charitable gift after they pass. They began to be able to support charities immediately with the value that is expected to be there at the end of their lifespan. We forward those dollars to a giving fund, and they can start supporting the charities of their choice immediately while receiving a guaranteed income stream for the rest of their life.

Bob:
December is the month where we come together to celebrate the birth of Christ. It’s always a magical time of the year when people open their hearts to giving. Is this one of the busiest times of the year for opening those donor advised giving funds?

Ryan:
It is. This is a great time of year to open a giving fund. Again, the main idea of a giving fund is it helps generous, Christian families decouple the tax implications of charitable giving from the strategic granting they want to make. So what we would say is open your fund, fund it right now at the end of the year. Take the tax conversation off of the table. Give away everything that you want to give away now at one time and then take your time. Be prayerful, be thoughtful, be strategic about what charities and churches and nonprofits you want to support and to what degree. How big should those checks be? Don’t just write random size checks because it’s the end of the year. Open a giving fund and decouple the tax implications of charitable giving with the strategic grants that you and your family wish to make.

Mary Jo:
Ryan, so we’ve talked a lot about ways to give and very unique ways to give. What else would you want to share with our listeners today?

Ryan:
I would say if you’re ever faced with the opportunity to sell an asset for an appreciable gain, whether that’s a business or a publicly traded stock or real estate, then consider giving that asset or a portion of that asset before the sale. If you’re going to sell a business and be charitable on the backend, then we would say give the business on the front end, part of the business on the front end, and let us help you save taxes and give more. Giving an asset before a taxable event is largely, wildly more advantageous than selling the asset and giving the cash later.

Mary Jo:
I think that’s pretty powerful.

Ryan:
Well, I want to thank our special guest today, Ryan Assunto from NCF, the National Christian Foundation. We’ve talked a lot about creative ways to give financially, especially here at the end of the year, including your time and your talents. We want to emphasize here that if you need any help with this, of course feel free to give us a call at 877-71-TRUTH or (877) 718-7884, and Mary Jo and I can talk to you how about some great strategies to multiply your giving.

Mary Jo:
As we wrap up our show today, we just want you to think about saying yes to God. When our giving glorifies God, it’s a win-win. It’s a win for you and a win for the kingdom. In 2 Corinthians chapter 9:7, “For God loves a cheerful giver.” How could generosity change you over the coming years?

[CONCLUSION]

Mary Jo: You’ve been listening to Christian Financial Perspectives. Join us as we explore more about how to apply biblical wisdom to your financial situations.

Bob: To make sure you don’t miss any of our podcasts, you can subscribe to Christian Financial Perspectives on iTunes, Google Play, or Stitcher. To learn more about integrating your faith with your finances, visit out website at ciswealth.com or call 830-609-6986.

Mary Jo: That’s all for now.

[DISCLOSURES]

Comments from today’s show are for informational purposes only and not to be considered investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any company that may have been mentioned or discussed. The opinions expressed are solely those of the hosts, Bob Barber and Mary Jo Lyons. Bob and Mary Jo do not provide tax advice and encourage you to seek guidance from a tax professional. Investment advisory services offered through Christian Investment Advisors Inc. DBA Christian Financial Advisors, a registered investment advisor. The information in this broadcast is not intended to be tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. You are encouraged to seek tax or legal advice from an independent professional advisor. The content is derived from sources believed to be accurate. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. National Christian Foundation, like all charities, is being compensated for their activities.