Click below to listen to Episode 108 – Christian Financial Principles Part 2

Christian Financial Principles Part 2

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Part 2 presenting the last 6 of 12 Christian Financial Principles to live by.

Welcome to part 2 of our 2 part series on Christian financial principles. In this episode, Bob and Shawn cover another 6 Christian financial principles to live by. All of these principles are directly backed by biblical scriptures that transcend time and are still just as relevant today as they were thousands of years ago.

The second 6 Christian financial principles that we are covering in this episode include:

  1. Pay others fairly
  2. Store up provisions for hard times
  3. Diversify using biblical principles
  4. Provide for your family
  5. Spend wisely
  6. Seek Godly, financial counsel

HOSTED BY: Bob Barber, CWS®, CKA®
CO-HOST: Shawn Peters

Mentioned In This Episode

Christian Financial Advisors
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Bob Barber, CWS®, CKA®
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Shawn Peters
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Inspire Insight
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EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

[INTRODUCTION]

Welcome to “Christian Financial Perspectives”, where you’re invited to gain insight, wisdom and knowledge about how Christians integrate their faith, life and finances with a Biblical Worldview. Here’s your host Christian Investment Advisor, Financial Planner, and Coach, Bob Barber.

[EPISODE]

Bob:
Welcome to our 108th podcast for Christian Financial Perspectives.

Shawn:
Today, we’ll be sharing part two of a two part series Bob developed called 12 Christian Financial Principles. In the last podcast, we shared the first 6 of the 12 principles. So today, we’ll be sharing 7 through 12 of Christian financial principles. These 12 Christian financial principles are something we should all strive to live by and are just as relevant today as they have been for thousands of years.

Bob:
Absolutely. These principles that we’re sharing today are just so timeless and full of wisdom because they come directly from God’s Word. Shawn, I love the part that it’s timeless. You don’t have to worry are these only going to apply to today? No, they’re gonna apply to today and they’re gonna apply 10 years from now and they’re gonna apply 50 years from now and a 1,000 years from now. Like I said in our last podcast, and this is a pretty strong statement, in my 37 years in business, in May it’s gonna be 38. So I’m heading right at the 38 years.

Shawn:
Yes, sir.

Bob:
I’ve seen a lot of people hurt financially by not following these Christian financial principles we’re gonna share today in this second part series, but I’ve never seen anyone hurt financially by following them. So, I’ve seen a lot of people hurt by not following them, but I’ve never seen anyone hurt that does follow these Christian financial principles. That’s a strong statement. I realize that.

Shawn:
It is. And that’s an excellent track record to say, you’ve never seen anyone hurt by following them. Then what do you have to lose? Right?

Bob:
And it just boils down to following God’s word and the scriptures.

Shawn:
So with that introduction, let’s quickly go over the first 6 Christian financial principles for those who didn’t hear the last podcast, or maybe it’s been a little bit since they listened to that episode. So they are principle number one, God owns it all. Number two, work is good. Number three, honesty in all financial dealings. Number four, pay your taxes. Yes. Pay your taxes.

Bob:
That’s correct. Remember that’s God’s provision. Remember, I told you in that last podcast, I was very convicted when a good Christian brother of mine, Ron Blue said, don’t complain about paying your taxes. That’s God’s provision. Ooh, that was a good one.

Shawn:
Number five, be careful with deb,t and number six, give generously. So if you didn’t hear our last podcast, I would suggest you go back and listen to that first as we went into great detail how each of those Christian Financial Principles applies today. So Bob, for today’s podcast, what is the seventh Christian financial principle?

Bob:
The seventh Christian financial principle, Shawn, is pay others fairly. Again, pay others fairly. Romans 13:7 tells us, “Give to everyone what you owe them. If you owe taxes, pay taxes. If revenue, then revenue, if respect then respect, if honor, then honor.”

Shawn:
That’s a great verse.

Bob:
It is.

Shawn:
Another one for you today is Matthew 22:36-40, “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the law. Jesus replied, ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it. Love your neighbor as yourself, all the law and the prophets hang on these two commandments.'” Love that scripture. I don’t remember who said it first, but it’s been summarized as what are you supposed to do? Love God. Love people.

Bob:
Love others. Yeah.

Shawn:
Love God. Love people. Yeah. Do those two things.

Bob:
And can you see how this scripture, when the financial principle of paying others fairly, how that comes into play?

Shawn:
Absolutely. Yeah. It does make sense because it kind of goes into the second commandment, loving your neighbor as yourself. Well, would you want to be paid fairly? Yes. So do you think your neighbor would want to be paid fairly? Okay. Then pay ’em fairly,

Bob:
Here are two examples that I can immediately think of being that I’m a business owner and have been for many years and that is, am I paying my employees a fair wage? And any Christian business owner needs to think of that? Am I paying my employees fairly where they can provide for their families? Another example that always hits me. I went out today for lunch. We prayed over lunch and it was with a client. We had a good prayer, hopefully that person’s thinking good thoughts. They were praying, and they’re Christian, cause we talked a lot about Christian and things over the lunch. This just reminded me, am I tipping my server appropriately at the restaurant that waits on me. These are just two examples I can immediately think of about paying others fairly because I’ve heard it said that many times on a Sunday, Christians are the worst tippers. That’s a sad thing because we should treat others fairly. I don’t like making that statement at all, but it’s very important. There’s a scriptural background for that. And that is, do we really love God? And do we really love others? It’s given to us in Romans 13 to pay people fairly and to respect them.

Shawn:
That’s great. Those are great examples, Bob. One of the complaints that I’ve heard from people is that why do I have to tip so much cuz restaurants should pay their staff a fair wage. And in most countries outside the United States, that is true. Like there’s actually laws about that. But just because the restaurant isn’t paying someone what you would think is a fair wage, doesn’t give you an excuse to not pay them. That’s the culture that we live in. And so, especially as a believer, what kind of example are you setting for these people who are like service people, right. They live off of tips. So you want them to think, oh well Christians, they don’t care about people. I mean not tipping them well, tipping them 10%, you know like okay, well that’s not really loving your neighbor as yourself, is it?

Bob:
Not when the average tip would be 15 to 20% today.

Shawn:
Exactly. So you know another thing too with paying your employees a fair wage, I think an example would be internships.

Bob:
That’s a very good example. Yeah. I’ve never thought of that one.

Shawn:
Many companies will use the excuse of an internship to either not pay their staff or to significantly underpay their staff by someone who’s like, oh, it’s an internship. There’s a stipend to help with fuel. But the purpose of an internship and the reason why we have them is to provide, typically students, with real world experience and an education, not to get free or almost free labor.

Bob:
Now that really hit home with us because we have a daughter that has tried to get into the music industry and talk about an industry that just uses these young people. It is terrible. And they get them excited like we’re gonna hire you and they never hire ’em. I watched this go on with my youngest daughter for years and years. She would get so excited, and then soon as the internship was over, they were outta there. That’s just the world’s way. But that’s not God’s way. That’s not the way we, as brothers and sisters in Christ, should act. Paying others fairly is truly a witness to our Christian faith. It demonstrates the spiritual principle of loving your neighbor as yourself. And we should never take advantage of another person just because we can.

Shawn:
Agreed.

Bob:
The principle paying others fairly is one of love. And it shows others that we care about them and we care about their self-worth. This Christian principle, Shawn, really tackles selfishness head on.

Shawn:
Agreed. Let’s go into our eighth Christian financial principle then, Bob, which is store up provisions for hard times. We’re gonna start with Proverbs 21:20, “In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil, but the foolish devours all he has.” And we have Ecclesiastes 3:1-8, “There is an appointed time for everything and there is a time for every matter under heaven, a time to give birth and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot what is planted, a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build up, a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance, a time to throw stones and a time to gather stones, a time to embrace and a time to shun embracing, a time to search and a time to give up as lost, a time to keep and a time to throw away a time to tear apart and a time to sew together, a time to be silent and a time to speak, a time to love and a time to hate, a time for war and a time for peace.” And that last part of that verse made really think because of everything that has been going on.

Bob:
Yeah. And this is why it’s so important that this scriptural principle about storing up provisions for hard times, because everybody seems to forget to do that during the good times. But if they do do that during the good times, they’re glad that they did for the tough times. And like you said, Proverbs 20:21, “In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil, but the foolish man – or woman, person – devours all they have.” Proverbs 30:25 is another scripture. And you know me, I love Proverbs, “Ants are creatures of little strength, yet they store up their food in the summer.” Now, I’m not saying to go store up and build bigger and bigger barns. I know the scriptural principle. I’m not saying to do that. I’m just saying to be wise and store up provision for hard times.

Shawn:
That’s a good point then, Bob. So how would we apply these scriptural principles of storing up provisions for our finances?

Bob:
Don’t devour everything that you earn during those good times on stuff that rusts and decays. Now, I’m referring to vehicles. I’m referring to boats. I’m referring to things that everything’s gonna burn in the fire, just rusts and decays, but instead save a portion of our earnings for those tough times, cause we’re gonna need ’em. And the second thing is living a disciplined lifestyle that is not based on materialism. Don’t associate your self worth with what kind of car you drive or what kind of home you live in. And realizing that spending money on just newer and bigger things over giving and saving, it is not wise, and it’s not going to bring that everlasting joy and contentment.

Shawn:
Let’s go to the next one. We are on the ninth Christian financial principle. This one is diversify using biblical principles. We’ve got a few scriptures here. Ecclesiastes 11:2, one of my favorites, “Invest in seven ventures. Yes, in eight. You do not know what disaster may come upon the land.” Ephesians 5:11, “Have nothing to do with the fruitless deeds of darkness, but rather expose them.” And 2 Corinthians 6:14, “Do not be yoked together with unbelievers, for what do righteousness and wickedness have in common or what fellowship can light have with darkness.” So Bob, how do we apply these scriptures for this principle to diversifying using biblical principles?

Bob:
You notice it’s interesting. We came off with Ecclesiastes 11:2 about diversifying. And then with these last two scriptures, what does that have to do with it?

Shawn:
Right. It’s investing. It’s like mixing oil and water or mixing light and dark. So what does that have to do with this?

Bob:
It’s using biblical principles? So the way that we apply these scriptural principles to diversifying using biblical principles is first by never investing everything in just one thing because that one thing is not always gonna be in favor. While at the same time, we need to stay alert of what investments we are investing in or supporting because when you buy into something, you own it and whatever that is doing, if you buy into a company, if that company is involved in immoral activities, that’s going against scriptural principles. So, you wanna be diversified. Right? But at the same time, you don’t wanna buy companies that would be involved in immoral agendas.

Shawn:
So in 2 Corinthians 6:14, you would be yoked together with unbelievers or you are a part owner in something that you would not do yourself. And you’re gonna have to be accountable for that to God.

Bob:
Yeah. That’s exactly right.

Shawn:
So going off of that then, Bob, what would you say an example of investing everything in just one thing would be?

Bob:
Well, that would be like putting everything in one basket. As an example, look at myself. I’ve been a business owner. I’ve owned Christian Financial Advisors for many, many years, but actually Shawn, more than half my wealth is outside of this business. Okay. I don’t have everything tied up in just this one business. Another example I see a lot of, especially in the town that we are, I mean it’s big. We’re in New Braunfels, Texas in between Austin and San Antonio, Central Texas, a very hot area. One of the hottest in the United States, if not the hottest for moving to in real estate. So man, I see so many people putting everything in real estate. So that’s an example. Or how about this? Just putting everything in just all cash with only one bank or one credit union as well. So, those are three different examples right there. And there’s many others.

Shawn:
What would an example of staying alert of what the investment may be supporting or involved in?

Bob:
Well does the real estate you’re buying have an objectable – like, does it have an adult bookstore in it?

Shawn:
Okay, yeah.

Bob:
Or is it promoting alcoholism?

Shawn:
So like who’s the tenant, like if it’s commercial real estate?

Bob:
That’s right. The bank – is the bank involved in possible immoral agendas? You’re like, well, how could the bank be supporting anti-family values? Pushing certain agendas.

Shawn:
Like activism and giving to non-Christian ideals.

Bob:
Exactly. That’s right. Stocks or bonds, same thing. Are you investing in companies or the bank or real estate that may be involved in any immoral activities like gambling, abortion, or supporting causes that violate biblical principles. And Shawn you’d be surprised how many, maybe you wouldn’t, but I think many people are surprised by that.

Shawn:
Yeah. I know we have programs that help with faith-based investing. Do you want to talk about that a little bit?

Bob:
We use one from our good friend, Robert Nestley of Inspire Investing. He has Inspire Insight, and you’re able to go pull up any publicly traded company and see what the company may be involved in on the immoral side and then the good things that they may be involved in, too. And they give them a score. We also have the eVALUEator, which is another program that we use.

Shawn:
Which Inspire, their screens, they actually will show not just negative screens, but it shows those positive things. So their overall score is not just, hey, are they avoiding certain negatives, but hey, what positive impacts are they making?

Bob:
And they can have a negative score from, I’ve seen -50, -30, or -10 all the way up. I’ve seen +50. So, you can go to that really good website. We ought to put a link for that in this podcast.

Shawn:
Yeah. For anyone who wants to go to it, it’s inspireinsight.com.

Bob:
Yeah. By the way, I was just texting with Robert this morning. He’s a good Christian brother friend of mine. I remember when he came to the office here, what, 12 or 15 years ago. And we told him about biblically responsible investing and he started an ETF, a biblically responsible ETF. So I love my brother there.

Shawn:
Yeah. That’s awesome. One other question for you, Bob, what about biblical diversification? Maybe talk about that a little bit.

Bob:
Man. Can I?

Shawn:
Have you had a little of experience with that, Bob?

Bob:
Absolutely. So when we say diversify using biblical principles as our ninth Christian financial principle, so I’m going to give you a little bit of a future podcast that we have coming. It’s not gonna be our next podcast cause our next podcast is gonna be on cryptocurrency. And then the following podcast is gonna be on the Ecclesiastes model, but I’m gonna give you a little example of that. So what do we mean by biblical diversification? Well, remember it says to divide your portions of six or seven or even eight portions. So, a good example is to take $10,000 and divide that by seven or eight portions. And this means for every $10,000 in investments, say if you divide that up, then that would be $1,250 to $1,400 per investment.

Shawn:
Depending if it’s seven or eight.

Bob:
Right. That’s right. The next one, a lot of people may understand better would be 100,000. That would be 12,000 to 14,000 in seven or eight different areas. What about 500,000? That would be 62,000 to 70,000 per type of investment. So what I mean is…

Shawn:
Depending on the size of the account that you’re talking about or the investment.

Bob:
You’re divided up, like it says here, give your ventures to eight. Yes, to seven, because you do not know what disaster may come upon the land. So you’re taking your money and you’re dividing it up.

Shawn:
Okay. That’s great. So another diversification that we’ve obviously seen, Bob, and I would say it’s pretty common for people to think about this, but what about diversification between investment advisors? You have multiple advisors that you’re working with. What’s the potential danger in diversifying in this way?

Bob:
The danger in that way is you don’t see the full picture. So it’s like, you’re gonna build a house. Would you take the blueprints and tear ’em in two or three or four and have four different different builders build that house.

Shawn:
That doesn’t make any sense.

Bob:
Think about all their scheduling all the subs at different points and times. They’re using different materials. They’re not coming off in one place and they wouldn’t know, well, did you order enough studs? Okay. So I’m using that as a parable example of that, be very careful that you may not be diversified at all. And I’ve seen this many times where you could be with three different advisors, but if they all have you in a moderate type portfolio, your exposure is going to be the same.

Shawn:
No, not to mention, depending on how much in assets you have, your fees may end up actually being higher because you only have a certain amount with each advisor and you don’t get any kind of price break points, which is common not just for us, but other advisors. Using your house example kind of makes me think of, there’s nothing wrong with having different contractors, but you wanna make sure they’re all working off the same plan. Maybe a way to combat that would be if you go that route, make sure each advisor knows what else that you have to make sure that you actually are within your risk tolerance and objectives. Right?

Bob:
Exactly. They need to be talking to each other. It’s just like if you’re gonna have heart surgery, right. The doctor is talking to all the other doctors because they wanna know what they’ve been giving you.

Shawn:
Or if you’re on certain medications or other kind of medical history. If they’re operating in that isolation, you’re creating more potential problems, and it’s okay that that one doctor doesn’t do everything for you medically. Same thing with your financial advisor. It’s okay. As long as the advisor knows about it, they can treat it more holistically instead of in a vacuum. Bob, what about some examples using the Ecclesiastes 11:2 model for investing. Can you give us some of those?

Bob:
Yeah. So here’s six or seven of ’em that I thought of. And one is I believe that everybody should have that portion just sitting in cash.

Shawn:
Why would you need just cash sitting there, Bob? I know the answer.

Bob:
Okay, that should be obvious. Like when the market’s down, that’s where you’re gonna draw from many types of real estate or, I mean, if they’re not publicly traded, it’s not easy to liquidate. So you answer that one, too. I want to hear what you have to say.

Shawn:
I would think the other reason you’d want to have some in cash, too, is it kind of goes into the emergency fund and having those opportunities as well. Because if it’s in cash, you can do something with it. But if it’s tied up in some other types of investments or certain type of investment accounts, you can’t touch it without penalties or liquidation issues. So having that cash, I mean emergency fund, but also for those opportunities when there’s a buying opportunity.

Bob:
And we are starting to see some buying opportunities. Definitely we’ve seen some. Yeah. The second area I like is real estate, but that needs to be diversified between residential and commercial and land. Shawn, I personally like publicly traded real estate investment trusts that are referred to as REITs because they offer all these sectors, but they’re very easy to buy into and very easy to sell without all the large title company fees and real estate commissions that come with them. Even within stocks, you need to think about all the different sectors to invest in like healthcare and technology and consumer staples and energy. I mean, you’re not gonna put it all in healthcare. You’re not gonna put it all in technology. You’re not gonna put it all in energy, even though right now, energy’s awful good. You wouldn’t put it all in the industrial sector materials or utilities, you’ll spread it around. Next would be bonds across many sectors of the economy from government to corporate bonds and stagger them across different maturities.

Shawn:
Maturities being how long.

Bob:
Exactly. Then you have your alternative investments that are not listed in any of the above, like possibly gold and silver, and then possibly a fixed annuity if it doesn’t carry a bunch of large commissions and surrender penalties. And last, maybe a safe business venture. I didn’t do this just a few months ago, but I looked at one as a different business adventure. It was investing in a septic cleaning system company. And you talk about recession proof.

Shawn:
Yep. Cause everybody poops, even when it’s bad or good times.

Bob:
Exactly.

Shawn:
I have that book for my son.

Bob:
So, I tell you what. I really looked at that and I said, wouldn’t that be a good business venture? Probably would. I mean, it’s pretty recession proof.

Shawn:
I’m gonna hold back on all the jokes that kept coming to mind.

Bob:
I know somebody laughed at that one.

Shawn:
So Bob, it seems like with all the sectors of stocks and bonds and cash, I mean, you could pretty easily hit all seven areas for investing, especially if you include real estate through say like the REITs.

Bob:
Yeah. You can. The wisdom behind the scriptural principle goes very deep to not only diversify many types of investments, but also Shawn, you wanna diversify by location. You just think about right now with what’s going on in Europe and Ukraine. Think if all of your investments were in that one country. So, you wanna diversify by location, especially like real estate because a hurricane can hit. You can have financial disaster hitting that one area.

Shawn:
That could kind of go into the idea we have domestic stocks and bonds and we have foreign or international. So like you said, you don’t wanna all be in European because what if something happens in Europe, you want to have some diversification there. Let’s go over our 10th principle.

Bob:
We got a lot of principles here.

Shawn:
Yeah, we do. So the 10th Christian financial principle is provide for your family. We’ve got a couple scriptures on this, starting with 1 Timothy 5:8, “Anyone who does not provide for their relatives, and especially for their own household, has denied the faith and is worse than an believer.” That’s a little harsh.

Bob:
Yeah. It’s pretty tough. Isn’t it?

Shawn:
Yep. Proverbs 11:29, “Whoever brings ruin on their family will inherit only wind, and the fool will be servant to the wise.” Also pretty straightforward.

Bob:
I’m pretty straightforward. I mean, this is a very powerful scripture providing for your family.

Shawn:
Yeah. So Bob, how do we apply these scriptural principles to finance?

Bob:
Well, I think it’s very clear about how important it is that we take care of the needs of our family. And when it says that those who don’t are actually worse than an unbeliever, I never want to be accused of that. I take this, as a believer, to be one of the most powerful and convicting scriptures in the entire Bible, especially when it comes to stewardship. I personally believe that the most important job for me, Bob Barber as a believer, is to protect and provide it for my family without any excuses, except if I am just totally physically and mentally unable to do so.

Shawn:
Yeah. Well that goes right into one of the things I wanted to share is the word “work”. I think we’ve said this, I don’t know if it was on the last episode, but I know we’ve said in recent episodes, the word work appears in the Bible over 500 times, but the word retire only appears once and not in the context of retirement the way we think of it today. If I remember correctly, the time it does appear, it was actually talking about the priest, right? The chief priest.

Bob:
Teaching the younger priest, exactly. They weren’t going into retirement in the way that we think of in America or in the west.

Shawn:
They were retiring to teach. Yeah. Which kind of makes me think of that idea of maybe you go into like a, I guess you call it a semi-retirement where you’re not doing what you’ve been doing, but you’re doing something else that God’s calling you to.

Bob:
Well, it’s like I’ve told you, God’s called me to do this. And this is where I feel I’m gonna be doing the podcast for many, many, many years to come.

Shawn:
Well it’s a lot, it easier to have a co-host.

Bob:
Yeah. It is.

Shawn:
I’ll share another scripture for this. Proverb 6:10-11, “A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to rest and poverty will come on you like a thief and scarcity like an armed man.” So bottom line, God calls us to provide for our families.

Bob:
He does.

Shawn:
And if you’re not sure why we said that, read those scriptures again.

Bob:
So now we’re gonna go into the 11th Christian financial principle. We’re getting down here to the end.

Shawn:
We’re getting there. So 11th one is spend wisely. We’re gonna go into Luke 16:10-12, “Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much. And whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches. And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own?” Matthew 25:14-30. We’re not gonna read the whole thing. It’s the parable of the talents, which is a very long one, but I would definitely encourage you read Matthew 25:14-30 where it talks about the three servants and you’ve got two of ’em that they did a good job. They took what their master had given them and they did something with it. And then you had the one who said, well, I knew you were hard. So I decided to just be lazy and stick it in the ground. Why would you do that? Don’t be like the third one. So how do we apply these important scriptural principles to finance for spend wisely, Bob?

Bob:
Okay. First and for most, I think it’s very important that we know where God’s money is going. You notice how I said that?

Shawn:
Amen. Yeah.

Bob:
Okay. Because we’re managers. That’s God’s money. We need to know where that’s going. And what’s so neat about today is – you can tell what generation I’m from – or cool.

Shawn:
Neat-o.

Bob:
What’s neat-o about today is we have all these financial apps and programs that make it easier than ever before. Shawn, I used the old envelope budgeting system back then.

Shawn:
With actual envelopes?

Bob:
Actual envelopes, and we would go get the cash out and put all the cash in each one. I mean, that was hard. But with these apps today, it makes it so easy. And it really comes down to just simple budgeting and tracking your spending when it comes to Christian principles. Spend wisely and real life examples include being wise about buying things like buying new cars too often that are just guaranteed to depreciate over a three year period. And new toys, like boats and other things when the old ones are working fine.

Shawn:
Yeah. That’s a good example. Like, do you really need that new one? Is it you want one or is it you need it? Like maybe your family’s growing. I know Jenna and I have been struggling with that where we want to get a slightly larger vehicle because we’ve got that second baby coming, but it’s not that we need a brand new one either.

Bob:
But the color is so pretty on the new one.

Shawn:
I refuse to even consider the brand new one when it comes to that stuff. I’m gonna get the used one. Anyway. So another one, I guess, Bob would be being careful of allowing programs like HGTV to persuade you to remodel a kitchen and buy all new appliances when your old kitchen and appliances are working fine. I can’t help but think how people in other countries must think about how wasteful Americans are.

Bob:
I know it. I mean, like, what’s wrong with that countertop. It’s not the right color, but it it’s not…

Shawn:
It’s last year’s color.

Bob:
Exactly. Yeah. Gotta realize this is all about marketing. Isn’t it? It’s all about getting you to go spend more money.

Shawn:
Yeah. That is true, Bob. It almost seems like there’s a connection. You see all of these manufacturers and stuff that you can buy for the home, counters, and countertops. They seem to be sponsors a lot of times for these home remodeling shows. I wonder if there’s a connection there.

Bob:
Shawn, I’ve been around a long time. I’ll be 60 in June. And it’s funny to watch stuff come around, but that was a popular color 25 years ago. Well, it’s time to bring it back.

Shawn:
Right? Exactly.

Bob:
Because you could have just kept your house like it was, and everything was functional, but you changed it to the new color last year. Now you gotta go back to this old color.

Shawn:
Yeah.

Bob:
So, we are down to the 12th principle aren’t we, Shawn?

Shawn:
Yes, sir. So we’re gonna go with number 12, seeking Godly financial council.

Bob:
Oh, so important.

Shawn:
Yes, sir. Let’s do a couple scriptures here. Ecclesiastes 4:9-10, “Two are better than one because they have a good return for their labor. If either of them falls down, one can help the other up, but pity anyone who falls and has no one to help them up.” Psalm 1:1-3, “Blessed is the one who does not walk in step with the wicked or stand in the way that sinners take or sit in the company of mockers, but whose delight is in the law of the Lord and who meditates on his law day and night. That person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit and season and whose leaf does not wither. Whatever they do prospers.” We just went over that in our church, too. Psalm 1:1-3 talks about, “Blessed is one who does not walk in the step with the wicked, stand in the way that centers take or sit in the company of mockers.” Do you notice there’s that progression there? It’s the walking and now you’re just standing there and now you’ve sat down with them.

Bob:
It’s good. I think of the beautiful trees here in the Texas hill country, these big Cypress trees that are on the Guadalupe River and how just big and majestic they are because they are planted by streams of water – God’s word. And they yield his fruit in season and they don’t ever whither and they’re prospering, which comes right down to godly financial council. You wanna seek that. I love the scripture from 1 Timothy 3:2-3, “Now the overseer is above reproach.” This is the kind of counsel you want to get from people that are above reproach, faithful to their spouse. Temperate. Self-Controlled. Respectable. Hospitable. Able to teach. Not giving in to drunkenness, not violent, but gentle. Not quarrelsome, not a lover of money.

Shawn:
That seems like someone you’d wanna get advice from.

Bob:
Exactly. Yeah. And who had the fruits of the Holy Spirit that we have in Galatians 5:22-23, “Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self control.”

Shawn:
So we have a few scriptures to kind of help show us how to apply these principles. I would say so. Bob, do you wanna try to maybe summarize these a little bit?

Bob:
I do. So when you’re looking for that Godly council from anyone, you wanna look for someone that has wisdom in life’s experiences, a little gray in the hair is not bad. Okay. A lot of gray is not bad, either. A good reputation in the community. One who has strong roots in the community and is a stable person. One that has a humble attitude and is gentle and patient, is a good communicator and listener. Has a willingness to answer questions and to teach you. One that believes an absolute truth and that truth is not relative, so they’re not double minded.

Shawn:
There you have it, everyone. The 12 Christian financial principles, well between the last episode and this episode. So to sum them up all in order, we have God owns it all. Work is good. Honesty protects. Pay your taxes. Be careful with debt. Give generously. Pay others fairly. Store up provisions for hard times. Diversify using biblical principles. Provide for your family. Spend wisely. And seek Godly, financial counsel. Now you can see why we had to split this into two episodes.

Bob:
It’s a lot there.

Shawn:
Yeah. We encourage you to not only live out all these Christian financial principles yourself, but to teach them to your children and your grandchildren.

Bob:
And Shawn, I’d like to say at the end here, like I said in the beginning, and I said in the last podcast and the beginning of this one. In my 37 years in business, I’ve seen a lot of people hurt financially by not following these Christian financial principles, but I’ve never seen anyone hurt by following them.

Shawn:
Amen. One way, for those of you listening, that you could help those you love is to tell them about these Christian financial principles and show them how to listen to the podcast, Christian Financial Perspectives. Today was our 108th podcast, and if you’ve not heard all of them, I would encourage you to go back and listen to all the different financial subjects we’ve covered from a Christian perspective. There’s 108 of them. I think I said that. Our podcast is available on every major podcast app on any smartphone. And you can also go to our website. We’d love for you to give us a positive review and let others know about our podcast just to get the word out. We’re always here to personally answer any questions you may have by calling or texting 830-609-6986 during normal business hours, or visit our website at christianfinancialadvisors.com and our podcast website is Christianfinancialpodcast.com. God bless and take care.

[CONCLUSION]

That’s all for now.

We invite you to listen to all of our past episodes covering many financial topics from a Christian Perspective. To make sure you don’t miss any of Bob’s upcoming episodes you can subscribe to Christian Financial Perspectives on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, or Stitcher. To learn more about integrating your faith with your finances, visit ciswealth.com or call 830-609-6986.

[DISCLOSURES]

Investment advisory services offered through Christian Investment Advisors Inc dba Christian Financial Advisors, also known as Christian Financial Advisors, a registered investment advisor. Comments from today’s show are for informational purposes only and not to be considered investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any company that may have been mentioned or discussed. The opinions expressed are solely those of the host, Bob Barber and his guests. Bob does not provide tax advice and encourages you to seek guidance from a tax professional. While Christian Investment Advisors believes the information to be accurate and reliable, we do not claim or have responsibility for its completeness, accuracy, or reliability.